Step8.jpg

Step 8: Move On Out!

Well, dear home sellers, we’ve come a long way—together! From the first coat of paint you used to freshen up your house’s trim to the stress of wrangling your way to a deal, Steve Miller and the Nashville Home Guys have been with you every step of the way. Now you’ve made it to the final hurdle of selling a home: moving on out!

Don’t worry, this is the easy part. But, as with the previous seven steps, you want to do it right—and that’s why we’re here to help to get you through the last leg of your journey! 

Get your timeline in order

Once the paperwork is signed at closing, the buyers will officially own the house … and you won’t. “So it is imperative that you have removed everything from the home and left it clean and ready for your buyers to move in,” says Miller.  If for any reason it becomes apparent that you are not going to be able to be out on the close date, you need to communicate that as early as possible to your Realtor before the close date.  The earlier the better, so a new possession date can be worked out. Sometimes, buyers are willing to close and then grant a 2 to 3 day period for the Sellers to move out, but this needs to be handled well in front of the closing or there is a chance you won’t be getting your money until you get out.  

What to leave behind

To make sure you’re leaving behind everything the buyer wanted—and that you agreed to—double-check the closing documents. There should be an itemized list of what comes with the house. And even if the buyers didn’t formally request them, it’s just good form to leave certain types of things behind.

If you do inadvertently take an item that the buyers had requested, they have the right to ask for it back—and they could potentially sue you in civil court for the cost of a replacement. So, when in doubt, feel free to check with the buyers before you grab and go.

But don’t leave anything else behind

Just as important as what you leave behind is what you don’t. Your buyers have a right to move into a home that’s been cleared of furniture and other movable items they didn’t expressly request.

Even if you’re careful, you might forget something—at which point the buyers may contact their agent to get it back to you, but they also have the legal right to just keep or get rid of it. So double-check areas (e.g., the attic, garage, basement, storage shed, kitchen, and bathroom drawers) where people commonly overlook items.

Clean up

It’s common courtesy to leave the place not only clear of your possessions, but also clean. However, that doesn’t mean you have to leave it immaculate. In most cases, a simple broom-clean will do. That means wiping down the countertops, cleaning out drawers, sweeping or vacuuming all the floors, and giving the bathroom and kitchen appliances a once-over so the new owners aren’t grossed out when they arrive.

Wait! Are you forgetting anything?

Before you close the door for the last time, run through a quick checklist. Did you eyeball every room for stray items? Have you forwarded your mail and turned off the utilities? Is the water running in the pool? We all get in a bit of a rush even in the best planned moves, but you won’t be able to get back in, so it can’t hurt to do a final run-through.

Once you’re ready, it’s time to leave. You can drop a line to your Realtor® to let her know you’re out, although it’s usually a courtesy more than a necessity. If you’re feeling truly gracious, feel free to leave a note, card, or bottle of bubbly congratulating the people who’ve inherited your former home. Given all the fond memories you’ve built between those walls, wouldn’t it be nice to start the home’s new owners off on the right foot?

And finally, buy yourself some Champagne, too. Make it the good stuff—you’ve earned it!!!

Source: Realtor.com
Steve Miller
Steve Miller
Affiliate Broker
964 Main St Nashville TN 37206